Between Five Bells Rose 2016

Between Five Bells Rose 2016

Geelong, Victoria. "Well, at the end of the day, our goal, and I think the end result, came down to this- make a rosé that is dry, with a deep pinkish/orange colour; that has a light oxidative bite, but is still generous and slurpable..."

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2014 Between Five Bells ROSÉ
Despite a love for the style here at Between Five Bells, there was never any real intention to make a rosé. With all the work that goes into the farming, then the making of the main wines, (the Red and the White), we never really built it into our plans. Fortune struck though, (in a strange way), and the 2011 vintage proved highly conducive to the creation of our first poolside-appropriate wine.

The majority of the 2014 Between Five Bells Rose is made up of saignéed (the process described above) Shiraz, Pinot Noir, Mouvédre and Grenache, all handled fairly oxadatively and élevaged in old oak. Added to this was the juice of Chardonnay & Riesling, and the contents of one 50L ceramic egg of Moscato Giallo that had spent three months on skins. (You can taste the Moscato as an exotic tang on the back pallet).
There was nothing especially dogmatic about the above process; it was just the route we took to create something that was dry, delicious, generous and textural.
 
A quick note on style
Not unlike many segments of the wine industry, there’s nowdays a niche of vocal advocates promoting a certain style of anti-industrial rosé. This is, without doubt, a good thing for wine lovers. I will add one layer of Between Five Bells opinion though- as a backlash against sweet, flat, hot-pink coloured supermarket rosé, there’s a current trend towards a more austere, pale style, that can be anemic and uniteresting when done badly. I only bring this up to say we still believe the heart of rosé is in pleasure, and pleasure comes from flavour. I think rosé should be dry and I think it should be fresh, it can even have bone-rattling acidity. But it has to have flavour.
 
What this all means
Well, at the end of the day, our goal, and I think the end result, came down to this- make a rosé that is dry, with a deep pinkish/orange colour; that has a light oxidative bite, but is still generous and slurpable.
 
 
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